Monthly Archives: February 2011

Doctor Faustus, at Blackwell Bookshop’s Norrington Room


faustus' attempt at a mexican wave was not well received by the audience

Creation Theatre have put on performances at the Oxford Castle, an island in the River Cherwell, and the Amphitheatre at the Said Business School. Now Blackwell bookshop’s Norrington Room is home to their latest offering, Doctor Faustus.


Blackwell’s Norrington Room has three miles of shelving, and has even entered the Guinness Book of Records as the largest single room selling books. The set immediately gets you in the mood: you enter the dimly lit basement, the audience surround the stage like a séance, and there are plenty of philosophy and theology books to flick through before the play even starts. It is the perfect location for our main character.


The play tells the story of Doctor Faustus, a scholar who has an insatiable thirst for learning. As he studies the dark arts he meets a servant of the devil, Mephistopheles, and offers his soul to the devil in exchange for absolute power. Christopher Marlowe’s text has been cut to make the play two hours long.


Gus Gallagher’s portrayal of Doctor Faustus is decent. His moral dilemma, however, is not convincing, and is hindered by the two masks that represent his conscience telling him to be good or evil. Gwnfor Jones’ plays Mephistopheles best in his moments of deadpan humour, and Alex Scott Fairley is enjoyable as the comical Pope.


The mix of sixteenth century and contemporary costumes, from Doctor Faustus’ renaissance clothes to the devil and his helper’s National Front-like get up of Doctor Martens and shaved heads, suggests that the devils live outside of time and can dress anachronistically. Director Charlotte Conquest’s five actors make excellent use of space. The staging is creative with actors leaping up through trap doors, disappearing through secret passages, and illusions such as living heads served up on silver platters. The tricks make the first half surprising and shocking, but are unfortunately overdone in the second half making it gimmicky and predictable.


The choreography takes pains, especially with the literal representation of the seven deadly sins: sloth being accompanied with lullaby music and gluttony with burping. A promising effort made more exciting by the stimulating venue.


Runs till 26 March.


To see or not to see: * * *